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Raspberry Pâte de fruits

Updated: Apr 6



Raspberry Pate De Fruit



WHAT IS PECTIN?

Pectin is a natural ingredient that derives from certain fruits and vegetables and functions as a thickener in cooking and baking. Citrus fruits like oranges, apples and lemons are naturally high in pectin, and you can find them in different parts of the fruits. For example, the peel and membrane of an orange and lemon, or the core and seeds of an apple has a very high content of pectin.


If you like to see what the natural form of pectin looks like, try boiling chopped up apples and its core until tender, then strain it through a muslin cloth and squeeze it really hard. What you will find when cooled, is this gooey substance being extracted that we call pectin!


When making pate de fruit, very often additional dried pectin powder are added into the recipe to help the gelling of the product, especially when fruits such as raspberry, blueberry and pears are low in the natural gelling substance.




HOW DOES PECTIN WORKS?

There are several types of pectin in the the market and not all are made for the same purpose. For the production of Pate De Fruit, you want to use a pectin that are often called Yellow Pectin or High Mythoxyl pectin. This pectins sets in conjuction with sugar and acid.


When using this type of pectin, it is important to bear in mind that it does requires a certain amount of sugar in order for a successful "set". In the case for Pate De Fruit, the amount of recommended sugar to use in order for the pectin to gel properly is somwhere between 60% to 80% to the fruit puree in the recipe, taking into consideration of the natural sugar that is present in your fruit.


Too little sugar, the pate de fruit will not gel properly, and too much will cause the pate de fruit to become overly sweet and firm in texture. The ideal texture of a Pate de Fruit is a texture that wil hold on to its shape and soft like jelly. It should not be gummy nor too firm.


Raspberry Pate De Fruit


WHAT IS HIGH METHOXYL PECTIN?

High methoxyl pectin usually relates to pectin that requires sugar and acid to set. The other type of common pectin in the market is the low methoxyl pectin, which on the contrary, do not need sugar nor acid to set but does require calcium instead for that purpose.


High methoxyl pectin is non-thermoreversible. This means that, once it has set, you are unable to melt it and set it again.


There are two common type of High Methoxyl pectin, the fast-setting and the slow-setting High Metoxyl pectin. For the purpose of this recipe, either one will work. If you are making pate de fruit with fruits pieces, it is advisable to use a fast setting option as this will keep the fruit suspended within and not drop to the base through rapid setting. A slower setting pectin is ideal if you need more time in the casting of the pate de fruit. For example, if you are not pouring them straight into the frame and wants to cast them individually into silicone moulds.



FUNCTION OF GLUCOSE IN PATE DE FRUIT

Glucose is an ingredient that is quite common in confectionaries. It derives from corn starch and is considered as a type of inverted sugar. Glucose functions to help diminish premature crystalization of pate de fruit, which can cause the fruit paste to have a grainy mouthfeel.


ACID

Because we are using high methoxyl pectin in this recipe, acidity is a neceesity to help the formation of gel in the confectionary. Citric acid or tartaric acid are often used for this purpose. To make the citric acid solution, use a 1:1 ratio of Citric Acid : Hot Water. For example, if the recipe calls for 10g acid solution, you will need 5g water and 5g citric acid. Ensure that the water is hot enough to dissolve the citric acid.


If you will be making pate de fruit all the time, you can make a larger batch of the solution and keep them at room temperature well covered indefinitely.


 

RECIPE


RASPBERRY PATE DE FRUIT

Quantity B makes 1 x (18cm x 18cm ) square frame

Quantity A makes 1 x (30cm x 30cm) square frame 2cm deep.

INGREDIENTS

QUANTITY A

QUANTITY B

Raspberry puree

550g

300g

Caster Sugar A

65g

35g

Yellow Pection

20g

12g

Caster Sugar B

670g

370g

Glucose

160g

90g

Citric Acid Solution

8g (4g boiling water + 4 g citric acid)

4g (2g boiling water + 2g citric acid)



CITRIC ACID & SUGAR COATING

INGREDIENTS

QUANTITY A

QUANTITY B

A1 Sugar/ Table Sugar

500g

300g

Citric Acid

10g

8g


 

METHOD


  1. Prepare the citric acid solution by mixing boiling water with citric acid.

  2. Mix sugar A and pectin together in a small bowl.

  3. Place the puree in a deep pot and bring to a boil.

  4. Once it starts to boil, sprinkle in the sugarA mixture while continously whisking.

  5. Add in the glucose and whisk. Divide sugar B in 3 - 4 additions, add each additions and bring the mixture back to a boil before adding in the next addition. It is important not to let the mixture cools down to prevent premature setting of the pectin.

  6. Continue to cook the mixture once all the sugars have been added until it reaches 107C.

  7. Pour into the prepared frame and leave untouched until it starts to set a form a skin.

  8. When ready to portion, dust generously with the Sugar/Citric Acid mixture on top and turn the pate de fruit around and dust the base as well. Cut to individual 3cm squares and toss each squares in to the sugar mixture until they are fully coated.

  9. Pack in containers and packaging.


SHELF LIFE

Up to 5 days at cool dry place.






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