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Indulge in Decadence: How to Make Inverted Chocolate Puff Pastry That Will Delight Your Senses


Chocolate Puff Pastry

I have made a fair few laminated pastries in my kitchen and one of which is the inverted puff pastry.


WHAT IS INVERTED PUFF PASTRY

Traditionally, puff pastry are made by encasing a sheet of butter with the pastry dough and then rolling them out and performing multiple folds to create the many layers. Inverted puff pastry does the lamination in the opposite way. Instead of encasing the butter sheet, the butter is wrapped around the dough instead.



BENEFIT OF INVERTED PUFF PASTRY

Inverted puff pastry is the perfect lamination method for beginners. Since the butter is covering around the dough, you are able to control it better without it separating or shattering inside when rolling.


The lamination for inverted puff pastry is also much easier to work with and with less tendency of the butter escaping from the pastry during baking, it results in a much crispier and lighter baked puff pastry.



ENGLISH LAMINATION METHOD

Some of the many different lamination method are such as the French Method, Scotch rough puff pastry method and English Method.


In the post for today, we will be making this delicious chocolate puff pastry using the English Method.


The difference between all the methods mentioned above is based on how the butter and dough are locked in before the folds are performed.


If we were laminating the puff pastry using the traditional way, the dough would be rolled to 1/3 longer than the butter sheet. The butter is then placed on top, covering the same width and 2/3 of the dough. The part of the dough without the butter on top is then folder over to cover 1/2 of the butter sheet, then the other end of the dough is folded over giving you 5 layers to start : dough - butter- dough - butter - dough.


In the case of inverted puff pastry, just reverse the dough as the butter sheet and vice versa, then apply the same concept. What you will end up with the inverted version would be: butter - dough - butter - dough - butter.


Hope that is not too confusing ! :)



PASTRY TERMS IN PUFF PASTRY THAT YOU WANT TO FAMILIARISED WITH


LOCK IN / LOCKING IN

In the process of making puff pastry, lock in or locking in is a common term used to describe encasing the butter with the dough. This is where you would often roll the butter to a sheet to similar thickness of the dough, then encasing the dough around the butter.


Locking in is not considered a fold - which many people often get confused with.



DETREMPE

Detrempe is a French word that refers to the pastry dough.



BEURRAGE

Beurre means butter in French. When it is related to lamination doughs, beurrage refers to the butter sheet you will be using for the lamination, not the butter that is incorporated into the dough.



FRENCH BUTTER/ FRACTIONATED BUTTER

These butters refers to a high fat content butter, usually above 82% and the fat crystals have been manipulated during manufacturing to allow for it to have a higher melting point. The higher melting point means that the butter will not readily melts like regular butter during the lamination process.


Due to its high fat content, the butter is also easier to manipulate and is much flexible which will not shatter as easily as regular butter, which makes it easy to laminated between the dough.

 


CHOCOLATE PUFF PASTRY DOUGH

INGREDIENTS

QUANTITY

BEURRAGE (BUTTER)

Fractionated Butter

350g

Bakers Flour

120g

Cocoa Powder

50g

DETREMPE (DOUGH)

Bakers Flour

380g

Water

180g

Unsalted Butter - room temperature

120g

Fine Salt

7g



FOLDS: (2 x Double Fold) + (1 x Single Fold)

LAMINATION METHOD: ENGLISH METHOD



 

To make the chocolate puff pastry.....


METHOD


PUFF PASTRY DOUGH (DETREMPE)


Place the bakers flour, softened cubed butter and fine salt into the mixer bowl fitted with a paddle attachment.


While mixing on low speed, stream in the cold water, allowing the dry ingredients to absorb the water. Reserve some water to see how the dough comes together, if they are coming to a nice dough, you can omit adding more water. Only add the rest of the water if the dough seems too dry and knead.


The final dough should not have any dry lumps in them and should just come together to a smooth dough.


Transfer the dough onto a work bench and knead to a smooth ball. Flatten and wrap in food wrap. Allow to rest in the fridge overnight.



DETREMPE VIDEO




 

BEURRAGE / CHOCOLATE BUTTER


Draw a template of 45cm by 20cm rectangle with excess on all edges.


Transfer the chocolate butter mixture into the center of the rectangle, ensuring that the marker side is on the underside so that is does not mix in with the butter. Spread with a palette knife.


Place another piece of parchment paper on top then fold the four edges to seal, roll the butter mixture with a rolling pin until you get a even 45cm x 20 cm butter sheet.


Place in the fridge to chill for 10 minutes before proceeding if the butter is too soft.




CHOCOLATE BEURRAGE VIDEO


 


LAMINATION


LOCK IN & FIRST DOUBLE FOLD

1. Roll the pastry dough to 20cm x 30cm rectangle.


2. Place the pastry dough on top of the chocolate butter sheet only covering 2/3 of the butter.


Starting from the side of the butter sheet with no dough on top, fold the butter over to cover 1/2 of the dough, then fold the opposite side of the dough over. You have now performed a lock in with the English Method of Lamination.


3. From one open end towards its opposite open ends, maintaining the 20cm width, roll to 65cm in length. Fold 1/3 of one end lengthways, then fold the opposite ends 2/3 of the way where the two ends will meet. Now fold the dough to half.


You have now performed your first book fold.


Wrap the pastry well, then rest in the fridge for 30 minutes.



SECOND DOUBLE FOLD + LAST SINGLE FOLD

4. Once the pastry have rested, generously dust you work bench with some flour, repeat step 3 to perform the second double fold.


5. Without resting, turn the dough around and from one open ends towards its opposite ends, roll the dough to 65cm in length, while maintaining a 20cm width.


This time, fold one ends lengthways halfway on top of the dough then fold the opposite sides over the top of the first half.


You have now performed the last single fold.





LOCKING IN WITH THE ENGLISH METHOD

English Lock In Method


ENGLISH LOCK IN & LAMINATION VIDEO




 

STORAGE AND USAGE


You can now wrap the pastry well in food wrap and freeze the puff pastry dough for up to 3 months or rest in the fridge for 1 hour rolling it to the desired size and width to use.





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